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A2619 



HBATHER 



TRAVLL 



^a;^, Sflpgg? 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

\<iiio*i;tOiic National Park, Ifyoming 83 

I IS, 1967 

Stuarary of 2',ay 1967 Monthly Narrative Report 

Cold first part of Hay, Warming trend 

-month, caused rapid decrease in snow 
cover, increased water flow. 
Max. Temp, 79 degrees; Min, Xeuip, -2 
degrees, 

'. visitor* ; 19735 automobiles; 

12. 331 decrease. 

Forage utilisation and ungulate use of 
winter ranges studied on the northern and 
Gallatin. 



OVL.» S.&rf vehicles Transferred. 



visitors 
foreign visitors 



IBM 

1 

2 



Mr. Cornelius W. Heine and Mr. McLain. 

Dr. and Mrs. Sander Bokonyi, Hungary, 

Mr. Arthur, Australia. 

Mr. Sidney F, Downey and wife, Nairobi, Kenya, 

East Africa. 

General Thmiuerg Party, loyal Swedish Air 

Force. 



SPECIAL ACTIVITIES Superintendent to Washington for meting in 

Director* s office with Master Planning team. 
Local matters discussed. 5 

Superintendent attended social functions for 
General and Mrs. Thumberg in the Park. 5 

Annual travel seminar by ¥• P. Co. held at 
Mammoth Motor Inn. 5 

Superintendent attended meeting of Board of 
Visitors at Missoula. 6 

Sub-Committee of the House Agriculture Com. 
toured the Park. 6 















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m.ipl«i ii i ii 111 ' ii wiim 

MMBMOUBM 



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IN SERVICE 
TRAINING 



Firat local sseetiag ox the JSteeter Plan 

Carl Beydea - *f the $elt £»k« Tribune 

s»t with Chiaf Park Tatars list. 7 

Park Faroes er Nkftft stt seated wither 
*r*aetixig in H®l<me, 

Heeeisg with sealers frota Colorado State 
University. 7 



Sen, 8PS 7 

£U$, Perry 7 

»*?.P,g« «<ea»*<w?fcl«sa Cfrasat Fulls 7 

Fishing aaaeoa dp&as&d Say 23* $ 

Decrease 1st payroll 3 

Savings ScwwJ - ?r**doo. Share C*&$&iga 

Sofeert I. Sellers, geitfc wsraer, Jack g» 
Gould and Charles A. lss&. 

Arthur £, white t 

Frederick T> AraSarseflt, &s^rvisxjry Park 
Ranger, Yosesaise, IS In Eaf^rcessent Officer* 
Y&lltiwjttooe. 9 

Park Ranger I gta g» , Tfe^asai promoted fc© 
Ci>ttc*s«i.c>ns Analyst is ^aahla^tait Office*. $ 

I*mi*JGtJM!j££b* fcaueluded tnlnins 
eoadueted by G$A in w*sfsIogtof*» B* C. $ 

Curtis R . Agde cso^ sat 04a ! . ♦ Arn old 
attend&d the GSA hmfwlllt scsaioa Seek 
Spriaga, Wyo. * 

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tallawste&s Mutisms 1 Perk, Wyoaiuf, 



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Park Rangers Jteraia aed Le4d attended 
Hoot am twtv Acadery, ftasaeam. 

Flr« Control Tsch* Srovo to KissouXa far 
«tK>keJuiHpi»£ rctraiftisMI easalaa. 



10- year Le^tb-'of^Sarvlcc 



Cbarles E. Cortiwtr 
Veync ft. Hoppe 
Ilalpb C, ting 
Uwreaoi F. ittaU^s 
Arthur £. vhlt« 

Slaia Flussser 



April 13, W7 
A?rlt 24, 19&7 
April 23, 1967 
Sec. 11, 1967 
August 3, 196? 



Stanley Csater, 8?», elected for 3 year 
tern Do» Hitehall, |&a* States Tel,, 
«lect&d t© cecspl&S© 1 ys&sr terau 

Charles La#&* Sfessorial hoapital. 

Clark's Saady-Mia Cosseretc Coast r. Co. 
began vork ia the Park areas Hay 31. 

Order to r« stasia work lamed to Peats 
Vac Post & Pole, &il&tt» Wy©. 

Husky Oil Co., C<Ay t \K*n bid oa road 
oil retirements far seeaoa. 



Invitee isa« welled to interested bidder* 
for coastructioa al Satreace Stat Ian. 

Gardiaar Migh School (Sradaatioa, Say 23 
Hnmetls graduates ax*s&ered a. 

Awards given. 

farewell dinner beotaplag Aaat. Supt. 
Hart i oak at Mttaata Hator Ina. 

Farewell Gst -Together fearer log Myrle 
Kiccali ef the Hea»Q*fe school faculty . 



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8ttfu Lovagre* br<rkfc aru, treated at 
iMMtt Clinic t fcBfcU tv> LlT JMSltU M 
for «*rgery. 



11 



Canyon Visitor Canter yp*»*<* Key 26. 12 

014 Faithful Visiter Caotar opaaad Hsy 1. 12 
All rasdaida axUibita opaa. 12 



Fran* Fhlliipa, East©*** Sfaaatm LKbcnpatery» 
t© install as&JMfca at Srast Village. 12 

Jokm Good mA Aufcr&y gaiftea went to 
Llviagsfcan to iiw?3**ifafca ©reniatariv 
Indian save alto* an Itefai tanclt. 12 



SelC-guidlag trails l&aflatn dlananand. 1? 

Mr. Cole »rapsrs4 illustrated talk «m alk 
fetf s&aetinga vifcti Oufcdssr i&itara Aaaeci* 
atlon and various naatinga minting to t&a 
?ark*s elk jsanagsaaat profanes, 12 



U.S. Geological S&rvsy Thermal Watara Study 
Taam providing on aita latoKaatton la Fira- 
kola lake araa. 15 



Flsii and Wild Li £e finrvica taaafeera start 
rasearcJt program at &»fce. 



Liatad 

take iaoaarativa, repairs ar« 



EQaip%*ent installed Z&s Canyon antoisstn 
arogran. Frograns prssantad as crowds 



13 
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Yallovatoaa Rational Fark, tfyortinj 






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SAFETY Am 
HEALTH 



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Sight reported law enforcement Incident: s» 
one reportable under FBI Uniform Crime 
Report. 



ie to Uncle Tom's Trail inspected. 
Five-year-old boy located. 



£igns end ant 
Center. 



stolen et 0* F. Visitor 



Seasonal employee injured in Maintenance 
Division. 

Twelve awtor vehicle accidents reported. 



Two-car head-on accident occurred 
Lewis Lake. One fatality end nine 
injured, vie t lets taken to Jackson. 



Marking of ueserd trees, tree removal 
being worked out with districts. 

Action taken on forest fire in the 
Uaaar Valley • 

Latest status o£ developments at fe'est 
tellowstone Interagency Fire Control 
Center. 

Fire Marshal Paui Connor completed 
brigade training exercise. 



Blister Bust Control maps prepared. 
Dalmation Toadflax program began. 
Meeting with Dr. Hoffitt. 
Concessions opened this month. 



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IS 

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Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 



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SAMITATXOT 



8UBBB Ag > 

F^Sfi CULTffiAL, 
ACTIVITY, 



Birds 

Elk 
Elk 



WlBterkilfad 
Mountain Lion 

otter 
V-hoop i ng C rane 



Diatrict Ranger Kuea and Park Ranger 
Lynn Thompson est trifch rep. of the Y.P, Co. 
Boot Division to discuss the boat dock at 
Weat rjHwb. 16 



walk- through Inspect ie>n s&de at Old 
Peitafui. 



17 



Mr. Charles Love, Hon&cna State U. observed 
anowslide possibilities at Sylvan Pass* 17 

Bear daesege to aato «r«t«rm»@ reported. 17 

Sear asnagesMaat and i»e-*r incidents listed. 19 

Migration evident 17 

Buffalo calves it Seat District. 17 

Elk calves at Harris s&S Fountain Flats. 17 

Transcript reviewed of oafelie hear i eg beld 
in Casper. 17 

Preparations ©ads for aeetiage on isassge* 
neat of elk herd* Copies of uat#s release 
sent o«t„ Inter sgeaey casting scheduled 
in Bosstsen. Public meeting scheduled iM 
Hseeoth. 17 

Availability of live elk. IS 

Data on northern Yellowstone elk herd. If 

Xo date 34 winterkilled elk. i 

Mountain lion reported in Canyon, gorris , 

find Lake area. U 

Five otter in vicinity of Alum Creek. II 

whooping crane sighted by Chief Park 
Naturalist G<xn4, 1£ 



Yellowstone Kationel Park, Wyening 






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Fishery tflMje&ewgtit Eaporte euboitterf to tke Regional Office, IS 

PPSU-CITY Y e How* tone Weekly Hev* iaatjed to keep 

employees, cooceeei otters, a ad others 
iofor&ed of Park happeaio&s. 20 



CHAPEL US£ 



Two prase releasee; Sdeerd J. Widaer's 
prexsotioa. Heavy irkw liielt* early viaitorra 
to the Park. 20 

Protestant services. 20 

Third Aaa«al YrSStj&te Symposia beld 

st Heoxseth Motor Xaa. 20 

Cfeief Perk tfotaraUst Soed spoke to 
Western Airlines Tr»v«l Agents *t tfMKdtfe 
Meter Inn. 20 

Seasonal Bsturalisf eecenpealed group 
of Air force pereemei through the Park* 



ftlg...H0.Lg..!!^ , I TOa^V 8ATTL£fISL& Listed 



PESIC8 AS§B 



Yellowstone ttatiotMl Psrk Listed 

gig Hole Hat local battlefield Listed 



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21 4 11 



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Yellowstone Stations! Perk, Wyoming 






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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE , mmmm * 

Yellowstone National Perk, Wyoming 83020 
' RE ri&78 : June 26, 1967 

Mestorandum 

To: Director 

From: Superintendent, Yellowstone 

Subject: Superintendent's Monthly Narrative Report, May 1967 

General 

Weather Conditions 

Cold weather prevailed during the first part of May. A general wann- 
ing trend began at mid-month and continued until the end of May. 
The warming trend caused a rapid decrease in the heavy snow cover, 
with a subsequent increase in water flow throughout the Park* 

Because of unusually high snow depth and water content for this 
time of the year, special snow measurements were taken at various 
stations on May 15. Following is a suaaiary of these snow conditions 
as they occurred on this date: 

Greatest snow accumulation - 66 inches - Lewis Divide 
Average snow accumulation - 41.0 inches 
Aversge water content - 17.7 inches 

By May 23, Lost Creek was flooding the meadow north of the Tower 
Ranger Station. Part of this flood water overflowed the normal course 
through Pleasant Valley and poured east toward the Yellowstone River 
bridge. There the water rushed on down the edge of the main road 
undermining the blacktop, washing out culverts and carrying away road 
shoulders on both sides (see enclosed photographs). Firk crews 
worked for three days to contain the flooding and to rechatmel Lost 
Creek back into its normal course through Pleasant Valley. 

Minor flooding damage was also reported along the Lamar and Gibbon 
Rivers. 




TAH 



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Various high and low teiuperatures recorded around the Park were: 





Hex. 




Mia. 






Jl^m. 


Data 


Temp 


Dote 


HMMBwB 


78 


5/22 & 23 


11 


5/ 1 


Laraar 


79 


5/23 


15 


5/13 


Old Faithful 


72 


5/23 


3 


5/ 6 


West Yellowstone 


77 


5/21 


6 


5/ 6 


Lake 


67 


5/24 


-2 


3/ 5 


Snake River 


75 


5/23 


4 


5/ 3 



Yellowstone lake was still ice bound as of Hay 31. 

Increas e or Decrease in T ravel 

Visitors entering Yellowstone National Park during May totaled 
71,046. Automobiles entering the Park reached 19,735. this is s 
12.1 percent decrease in travel as cooapared to May 1966. 

Due to anow depths, Dunraven Pass was not opened to travel until 
noon on May 27. Craig V&9& was opened or. the 17th , snow depths 
on this Pass were around five feet when it opened. Within two days 
bears were begging along the road. Sylvan Pass opened on Hay 26. 
The Beartooth Highway opened on Hay 26, but was closed the 29th and 
31st, six hours each closure, due to snow storms. 

By Hay 26, the entrance stations were operating on a 12-hour schedule. 

Coopered to May 1966, there was a 12.4 percent decrease In travel at 
the North Entrance. A total of 599 Golden Passports" were sold at 
this entrance In May. 

There was a decrease in travel of 11 percent at the South Entrance, 
In May 1966, 3,166 vehicles entered this entrance while 2,833 entered 
in Hay 1967, One hundred and thirteen '^Golden Passports" were sold 
at the East Entrance. 

Due to late melting snow and storms, there was very light travel in 
the Old Paithfui srea. The Old Faithful caiapground was not usable 
until the last few days of the aonth and the Madison campground was 
not opened until the 19th due to snow. 



2 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 



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At the West Entrance a total of 701 '^Golden Passports" were sold as 
compared to 850 sold during this period last year. 

Range Studies 

Emphasis throughout the month was on evaluation forage utilization 
and ungulate use on the Northern Yellowstone and Gallatin winter 
ranges . 

On the Northern Yellowstone winter range utilization of key grass 
and browse species was measured on 32 permanent study plots. Browse 
utilization and condition was measured on three aspen, six sagebrush 
and two willow plots. An index of relative ungulate use on most of 
the plots was obtained by pellet group counts. In addition to 
obtaining quantative measurements of forage utilization on perma- 
nent plots, general utilization patterns were evaluated by recon- 
naissance of more extensive areas of winter range. By the end of 
the month evaluation of forage utilization on the lower one- fourth 
of the winter range had been completed. 

Forage utilization was measured on 10 permanent plots in the Upper 
Gallatin winter range on May 25 and 26. Relative ungulate use was 
determined from pellet group counts on four permanent transects. 
Most of one day was spent examining winter range use in the Daly 
Creek-Black Butte Creek-Lava Butte Creek area . 

Utilization of old growth grass and browse was extremely heavy 
throughout the winter range; much heavier than during the winter 
of 1965-1966. Use of new spring growth was also much heavier than 
any other year since estimates of spring utilization have been 
obtained in 1965. Elk days use per acre were the highest since 
the winter of 1963-64. No winterkilled elk were found, however, 
Eorage utilization on the Gallatin winter range is covered in more 
detail in a separate report. 

Over- Snow Travel 

The two "Bomber dier-Muskeg" oversnow vehicles reported excess on 
Report No. 101-1-67 were transferred to the Bureau of Land Management, 
State Radio Shop, Lander, Wyoming. The units were picked up May 16. 



3 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 



Via Iter a 

Mr. Cornelius W. Heine, Special Assistant to the Director, Washington, 
D. C, attended the Third Annual Tri-State Syraposiusi Hay 11, 12, 13. 

Mr. McLain, Chief Budget Analyst, National Park Service, Washington , 
D. C, was in Yellowstone May 23. 

Foreign Visitors 

On Ksy 23 through the 25th, Dr. ax& Mrs. Saudor Bokonyi, from Hungary, 
visited the Park. Dr. Bokonyi is the Museologist in Chief of the 
Hungarian National Museum, Budapest. He is also an authority on the 
history of sni&sl domestication. Be is itponsorsd by the institute 
of International Education end is on e Ford Foundation Fellowship for 
one year ending nest July. 

He and his wife were both enthusiastic ebout all features o£ the Park, 
but were particularly Interested in the wildlife. He was an ardent 
photographer and took s»ny pictures. It was quite abusing to hear 
Mrs. Bokonyi talk to the beers in ffeugssrian - <a& apparent language 
barrier . 

Mr. Trevor E. Arthur, fro© Australia, visited the Park Hay 30 and 31. 
Be is with the National Parks Authority end has extensive experience 
in the Victoria Forest CoEsaissios. Mr. Arthur is studying all 
aspects of national park procedures and tsanegetsent in the thai ted States 
and Canada. Prior to coding here he bed attended the Introduction 
to Park Operations course at the Albright Training Center. He bed a 
good knowledge of Park Service policies *nd operations. Be was very 
glad for the opportunity to visit Yellowstone &nd expressed his 
appreciation* 

Mr. Sidney P. Downey end his wife, froa Nairobi, Kenya, East Africa, 
visited the Park May 15 through 17. Mr. Downey is a partner in the 
Ker, Downey ami Selby Safaries Ltd. and has been interested 
and influential in the development of National Parks In Kenya, Tanza- 
nia and Uganda. Mr, and Mrs. Downey are very gracious and appreciative 
people with a special interest in wildlife. 

On May 9 and 10 the General Thucabarg Party, of the Royal Swedish Air 
Force visited the Park. This party was sponsored by the U. S. Air 
Force and consisted of Lieutenant General Lege Gustsf Herald Thuaberf , 
and his wife Mrs. Brigit Bergetrom Thtrajberg, Brigadier General Arvid 
Hans Magnus Neij, Deputy Chief of Air Staff for Personnel, Organisation, 
Training and Public gelations, Colonel Costa Ludstron, Air Attache, 
Babes sy of Sweden, and Captain Hans grik Uagiaan, Squadron Leader. 
They were escorted by Lieutenant Colonel Steven L. Bartslsky, 0. S. 
Air Force, Washington D. C. 



Yellowstone Stations! Park, Wyoming 






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The loaln purpose of tha visit was to acquaint General Thumberg and 
party with U.SJI.F, facilities, equipment , sod methods of operation. 
The General had specifically expressed a desire to visit Yellowstone 
National Park while in the United States. 

These were all very interesting people. They were knowlegable, inter- 
esting , and enthusiastic. General Thus&erg was especially Interested 
in wildlife mid had a good knowledge of. all species observed. 

Special Activities 

The Superintendent and several members of the staff attended special 
social functions held in connection with the visit of General end 
Mrs. Lags Gusts ve Thusaberg to the Park. The General is the Cxmsa tiding 
Officer of the Eoyel Swedish Air Force, lie was accompanied by a party 
of four officers including Lieutenant Colonel Steven L. Bartalaky of 
the united States Air Force. The visiting party h»4 s quick tour of 
Yellowstone sod although the weather waft not too pleasant the General 
obviously enjoyed his visit *&& thereby "fulfilled a lifetime objec- 
tive." 

Superintended: McLaughlin was in the Director's office in ^shtngton, 
D. C, Hay 1*4 to attend the organisational meeting of the Yellowstone- 
Crand Teton naster planning team. Other IctcsI scatters such as the 
proposed Old Fait hf a I road bypass, proposed a me nd ment, further 
winter opening ©f roads were discussed with the Director and Kiadbers 
of his staff. 

On the return Crip free Washington, S. C, Mr. McLaughlin attended 
the Annual Meeting of the Wyoming Division of the I seek Walton League, 
Kay 6 and 7 in Casper, Wyoming. Ra appeared on the meeting program 
to discuss the Is^act of Visitor Use on Yellowstone Hat ions 1 Park. 
There wes sLso considerable discussion of elk tsanagement tsatters in 
Yellowstone. 

The Yellovstoue Park Company lie Id its annual travel seminar et the 
Mammoth Motor Inn, May 11*13. The meetings were well attended and 
an interesting progress was presented. The Superintendent opened the 
meeting with an official welcome and there was an interesting response 
by Company President Art Baaata. An effort was made to Induce con- 
cern about the natural resources ox the Park and thereby get the 
considerations above and beyond the uaual resort travel promotion 
level. To sacse degree this eageaderod some interesting discussions. 



Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 















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Dr. Vincent Schaefer of New York State University gave an interesting 
talk on winter conditions in the Park and came out in opposition of 
further opening of roads in the winter months, much to the conster- 
nation of certain people in the audience. An interesting and useful 
discussion followed. Senator Clifford Hansen of Wyoming attended the 
banquet on the 12th and presented the Yellowstone Park Company's 
Man of the Year Award to Frank Norris, Director of the Wyoming Travel 
Commission. 

The Seminar also featured presentations by Jim Atkinson, formerly 
with the national parks of Canada and now Executive Secretary of the 
Banff Chamber of Commerce and representatives of EXPO 67. 

The Superintendent attended the serai-annual meeting of the Board of 
Visitors of the School of Forestry of the University of Montana in 
Missoula on the 18th and 19th as well as the Dedication of the U, S. 
Forest Service Forest Research Building on the University campus on' 
the 19th. Senator Lee Met calf of Montana made the Dedicatory address 
and Director Joseph Pehanic of the Forest Service Intermountain 
Research Center was Master of Ceremonies. About 250 people attended. 

The Sub-Committee of the House Agriculture Committee consisting of 
four members headed by Congressman Poage of Texas, Stubblefield of 
Kentucky, Gooding of Pennsylvania, and Hansen of Idaho, were given 
a quick tour of the Park in the afternoon of the 27th. The group 
was accompanied by Congressman William Harrison of Wyoming who was 
an interested participant but not as a member of the Committee. 
President Ray Li Hie of Grand Teton Lodge and Transportation 
Company had the group in for a dinner party on the evening of the 
27th at his home along with the National Park Service master plan 
team which was in Grand Teton at the time. The Superintendent held 
some interesting discussions with Congressmen Hansen and Harrison on 
Park matters, particularly more opening of roads in winter in Yellow- 
stone. Both mem, particularly Congressman Harrison, think the roads 
should be opened, but they both have some unrealistic ideas as to the 
costs involved in keeping the roads open and providing for public 
safety . 

The first local meeting of the Yellowstone-Grand Teton master plan 
committee met in the two parks, May 27-28 they were in Grand Teton mov- 
ing on to Yellowstone on the 29th and remaining there for the remainder 
of the month. The Committee was briefed by the two Superintendents 
involved and looked at problems, plans, and uses of the public. The 
Committee consists of Chester Brown, WASO, Chairman; Joseph Penfold, 
Izaak Walton League, Washington, D. C; Harold Fabian, Salt Lake City; 
Sigurd Olson, Ely, Minnesota; Nelson Murdock, Associate Regional 
Director, Omaha, Nebraska; and the Superintendents of Grand Teton and 
Yellowstone. 

6 

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 



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On May 12 Carl Haydcn, roving writer-photographer for the Salt Lake 
Tribune, visited with the Chief Park Naturalist. Mr. Hayden was 
here in connection with the Yellowstone Park Company's annual travel 
seminar . 

On May 23, Park Forester White traveled to Helena, Montana, to attend 
a weather modification meeting. There were twelve other federal, state, 
and private agencies represented. The meeting was called by the Soil 
Conservation Service in order to better acquaint those present with 
weather modification activities now in progress and solicit discussion 
on the future of weather modification as it might affect the various 
agencies. A separate report of this meeting is being prepared. 

During the evening of May 28, the Chief Park Ranger, Assistant Super- 
intendent (OPR), Acting Assistant Superintendent (SS) , and the Park 
Forester met with a group of forest recreation seniors from Colorado 
State University. Various aspects of Park management were discussed 
as the entire program was kept on a very informal basis. 

Vital Statistics 

Birth 

A son, Bryan Eric, was born May 5 in the Memorial Hospital, Livingston, 
Montana to Assistant Chief Park Naturalist and Mrs. Stanley G. Canter. 

Death 

Mrs. Gisela Dies, age 27, from 694 Radar Squadron, Lewi st on, Montana, 
died instantly in an automobile accident which occurred at 3:00 p.m. 
on May 1, approximately two miles north of Lewis Lake campground. 

Russell Perry, five years of age, was drowned Friday, May 19, in Sosith 
Carolina. Burial was in Livingston, Montana. Mr. C. A. Perry, Yellow- 
stone National Park employee, is Russell's grandfather. 

Miscellaneous 

The National Federation of Federal Employees held a State Convention 
in Great Falls, Montana on May 12 and 13. George J. Tracy was re- 
elected State First Vice President. 



7 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 



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Administration 

The general fishing season opened at sunrise on May 28 with most 
streatae running in flood conditions. Good success was reported at 
the Blacktail lakes and slow conditions were reported at Trout Lake 
although several 7% pound and 8k pound fish were taken. 

There were 274 on the payroll for the period ending May 6 compared to 
286 a year ago. There were 298 on the payroll for the period ending 
May 20 compared to 311 a year ago. There were 350 on the payroll for 
the period ending June 3 compared to 360 a year ago. 

Total paid employees as of May 31, 1967 . • • 351. 

The month of May was designated for the 1967 Savings Bond - Freedom 
Share Campaign. We are a little late in getting the campaign organised 
since material was not received until the latter part of the month. 
The Superintendent has designated Personnel Officer Miller as the 
Campaign Coordinator, and he has asked the Division secretaries, and 
Helen Tracy of the Superintendent's Office, to serve as Keywomeo to 
assist in providing information to permanent personnel and to accept 
their enrollments. The local campaign will run through June 16. 

Transferred In 

Robert E. Sellers, Supervisory Park Ranger at Glacier National Park, 
to Yellowstone as Supervisory Park Ranger (Assistant Chief) GS-453-12, 
effective May 7. 

Keith Warner, Supply Clerk, Glacier National Park, to Yellowstone as 
General Supply Assistant GS-2001-7, effective May 21. 

Jack £. Gould, Electronics Technician, U. S. Forest Service, Santa 
Barbara, California, to Yellowstone as Electronics Technician GS- 856-9, 
effective May 21. 

Charles A. Lamb from Park Ranger, Albright Training Center, to Park 
Ranger GS-453-5 to be effective June 4, Yellowstone. 

Transferred Out 

Arthur E. White, Fireman-Low Pressure (Subject- to- Fur lough) has been 
selected for promotion to the position of Maintenanceman at Flaming 
Gorge Recreation Area. The effective date of Mr. White's transfer is 
June 4; his last day of work here was May 31. 



8 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 



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Selected 



Frederick T. Anderson, Supervisory Park Ranger GS-9, Yosemite, has been 
selected for promotion to our vacant Law Enforcement Officer position. 



Effective date, June 18. 



Park Ranger Lynn H. Thompson has accepted promotion to the position 
of Concessions Analyst GS-9 in the Washington Office to be effective 
June 18. 

In Service Training 

Assistant Procurement and Property Management Officer Louis G. Walisch 
completed one week of training conducted by the General Services Admin- 
istration in Washington D. C. During this one week training he com- 
pleted two courses: Inventory Control of Supplies and Materials, and 
Economic Order Quantity Techniques. 

Accounts Maintenance Clerk Curtis R. Anderson and Personnel Management 
Specialist Oda L. Arnold attended the General Services Administration's 
training session, Shipping Household Goods, in Rock Springs, Wyoming, 
May 26, This was a six hour course. 

Park Rangers Gerald E. Mernin and Benjamin F. Ladd completed the 80-hour 
Montana Law Enforcement Academy conducted at Montana State University, 
Bozeman, Montana, May 7 through May 19. 

Forestry Technician Reeves attended a Basic Management Techniques 
Training Course May 1 to 5 in Billings, Montana, conducted by the 
Portland Office of the Civil Service Commission. 

On May 2, Fire Control Technician Larry Brown departed for Missoula, 
Montana, for a five-day smokejumping retraining session. 

Emb lems 

The Department of the Interior's 10-year Length- of- Service Emblems 
were presented to the following employees: 

Completed 10 years 
Name of service as of: 

Charles E. Cortner April 13, 1967 

Wayne H. Hoppe April 24, 1967 

Ralph C. King April 23, 1967 

Laurence F. Wanlass December 11, 1966 

Arthur E. White August 3, 1967 



9 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 



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Clerk-Typist Elsie Plummer was presented her 10-year pin at an 
informal ceremony in the Supply Center which was attended by mem- 
bers of the Supply Branch and other members of the Administrative 
Division. 

School Board Election Results 

Voters elected Stanley G. Canter to serve a three-year term on the 
Yellowstone Park School Board, and Don "Mitch" Mitchell was elected 
to complete the one-year term. Eighty percent of the registered voters 
cast their ballots. 

In Hospital 

On May 30, Park Ranger Charles G. Lamb was taken to the Livingston 
hospital for treatment and observation following a possible heart 
attack. 

Contracts 

Clark's Ready- Mix Concrete Construction Company began work on the 
Utilities Extensions at various areas in the Park on May 31. Forty- 
one days of contract time remains on this project. The completion date 
is recorded as July 10, 1967. 

An order to resume work was issued May 24 to Penta Vac Post & Pole, 
Uulett, Wyoming, to continue construction of Footbridge at Old Faith- 
ful Area. Thirty-nine days of contract time remains for this project. 

Contract Awarded 

The Husky Oil Company of Cody, Wyoming was the successful bidder on 
our road oil requirements for this season. A contract with a monetary 
value of over $100,000 was awarded to this Company May 12. 

Invitations to Bid 

Invitations to Bid have been mailed to interested bidders for Project 
YEL-S128 for construction of Entrance Station, East Entrance. Bid 
opening date is 2:00 P.M. local time, June 1, 1967. 

Miscellaneous 

Gardiner High School Graduation was Tuesday evening. May 23. Among 
the graduates from Mammoth were Janet Ashley, J. Warren Fisher, 
Claurlce Forsness, Almyra Foster, Patrick Hanner and {Catherine Kurtz. 

10 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 






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The Citizen's award, sponsored by the American Legion Post, 118, and 
the American Legion Auxiliary, Unit 118 of Gardiner, for the most 
outstanding boy and girl citizen, was won by Warren Fisher and Janet 
Ashley. 

Warren Fisher won the $100 Educational Scholarship sponsored by the 
Gardiner Education Association and the Mammoth and Gardiner PTO. 

A Farewell Dinner, honoring Assistant Superintendent J. A. Martinek, 
was held Sunday, Kay 7, 1967 at 6:30 P.M., at the Mammoth Motor Inn 
Map Room. After dinner, Marty showed movies and some slides he took 
while in Africa. 

A Farewell Get-Together was held for Myrle Niccoli, of the Mammoth 
School faculty. It was sponsored by the Guild, Hay 25 at 7:30 to 
9:30 P.M., at the John Whitman residence. 

On May 21, Susan Lovegren, daughter of Assistant Superintendent 
Lovegren, fell from the slide at the canteen playground and broke her 
left arm. She was treated at the Mammoth Clinic and taken to the 
Livingston hospital for surgery. 



11 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 















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jftti Sggvfc** ,*«»* Pl*n&iafi 

the Canyon Visitor Center opened Stey 26 at noon, and the Old Faithful 
Visiter Center cm $ay 1. Ntfc operated on *a $ *.au to S p. a. a&bedule 
daring ti» saoatfe, with the ranger pe^a-aamsi at Canyon cooperating In 
keeping the facility open during the laaeh 'sour. 

Cone talks at Old SF&itkiul began on Hay 16 with 42 pvo&x&etS ]>ee»sot«d 
to 5* 152 visitors. Cassfkfire pntgVStHt feasts or May 27* 

Ail roadside exhibits ere open; Isa Labs aad Firehole Crayon on Hay 
26 and Obsidian Cliff on Hay 29. 

frnspe^iq* 

frank Phillips, Eastern Musette* laboratory, arrived la the perk my 15 
to install exhibit a at the £rent ?ill&£*s .<ta&ftu6i. Enhibit lastiiildticm 
began on «ay 17 and the job wes completed sen **ty 24. 

History 

On Hay 15 Ohiei Park Matttraliat Cood and Park naturalist ftaia*a visited 
the Raha rasch soMth of Livingston to iav&stl$ate prabisterric Indian 
cav* sites on that property* 

iteesaB Mi *** ******* twgctfiLuiB 

Sel£-gsiding trail® leaf lets dispensed dttrissg the month ware: 

Hyper Seyaer Saein 3000 (est.) 

fonataia Paitst Pots 2200 (est.) 

Had Voiceae l$80 

Terrace lie tare Trail $00 <es£.) 

Reeteroh ji-pl^iyt Cole's 

tfork in Yellowstone involved preperias as illnat rated talk on elk 
relationships It* the Park's prieiary pnrp&s^ {ecosystem approach) 
for a scheduled tseeting with the Outdoor writers iUaociation and ior 
various meetings relating to the Perk's *S9t *fianage?«eot program. 



12 
Yellowstone National Jerk* Wyoaiag 



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U. 3. Geological S u rvey 

the U. S. Geological Survey Thermal listers Study Testa la down to the 
450 foot level ia taeir second well in the Firehole Lake area. They 
Are providing on site information service to the public about their 
operation. 

Members of the Fish and Wildlife Service started raoving into their 
facilities at Lake on Hay 24 and immediately started their research 
program. 

Collection Pergvi ts 

The following collecting permits were approved; 

John F. Burger* U. of Calif. , Berkeley Calif, Insects 

Delbert A, Greenwood, Utah State University Water & plants 

LeRoy K. fienry, Csmegis Huseuat, Pittsburg Plants 

W» Hilton Johnson, University o£ Illinois Rock & einerals 

Dr. Jessep g, Lov, Utah State University lister & plants 

Charles F, Mueller, Montana State University Sagebrush liaaard 

Lewis K. Haptoa, Univ. of Calif., Berkeley Obsidian 

Stephen Spoagberg, Midwestern University Soil samples 

Cery A. Wright, University of Michigan Obsidian 

Wayne Winters, U.S. Steel, Geneva, Utah Water 4 plants 

T. Yaaaraoto, University of Toronto Insects 

Park Haturali^t 5lary Meagher was notified by Robert M. Linn, Acting 
Chief Scientist » Division of Natural Sciences, Washington Office, 
National Park Service, that her regaining school enrolliaent costs would 
be covered by the ftstionsl Park Service research training pr agree 
announced I yrj&x end a half ago, 

Selataograph 

The station at Lake was checked May 23 end found to be inoperative. 
The paper will not advance after the recycle period, Repairs are 
underway. 

Visual A^ds m) 

Equipment for the Cany&a automatic progress was lasts lied on Hay 31 sad 
is ftncti tuning P^'^perly; programs ere being presented as the crowds 
warrant. 

13 

Yellowstone Rational Park, ^yoiaing 






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A total of eight reported lev enforcement incident* occurred during 
May, Of this masher, one was reportable under the FBI Uniterm Crime 
Report. For comparison, there were 22 lew enforcement incidents reported 
in 1966 Cor the setae period. 

An inspect ion of Uncle Tom's Trail on my 23 by Canyon Ranger personnel 
revealed ton aider obi* daosge has resulted since last fall frow falling 
rock. Msny large boulders have cob* to rest on the black-top trail 
on the upper pert, ttiad extensive dsewge has resulted on the steel stair- 
ways on the lower pert. 

Assistance was given in locating a $-y@ar-aid boy on the 24th. 

One offense &G&xL&ped on the 26th at Old Faithful when several signs 
and a car radio antenna were stolen from iha Old faithful Visitor 
Center grounds* 

Safety and ife^ith 

One on-the-^h injury was reported for a seasonal employee of the Main* 
tenaace Division, This wss not a lost tisje accident but the employee 
did require sedlcal treatment. (lQO-dsy scheduled change). 

Twelve motor vehicle accidents occurred in l<fey. A total of 25 motor 
vehicle accidents have bean reported sad Invest igeted for the year 
through Hey* 

On May 1, during s heavy snowstorm, a two-car. head-on accident 
occurred in the vicinity of Lewis Lake* Tito accident resulted in one 
fatality and nine injured victim*, two of them seriously, all required 
hospitalisation for varying length) of tine. One driver was a mesihtr 
of the B. 8. Air Force, and the other a enfeaber of the want Oeraen 
Anay. This accident precipitated three other vehicles being involved 
in accidents at the original scene due to the first eccident vehicles 
obstructing the road. Esngers from Canyon » lake, West Thus&, Snake 
River, and Crand Teton national Park assisted in the emergency pro- 
cedures related to this accident, ms well as numerous Perk Etsiateuaace 
people. Since the take Hospital was nut in operation the victims were 
taken to the Jackson Wyoming hospital. 

Maintenance 

The marking of he sard trees Along roads and developed areas began 
May 12. Coordination of tree removal is being worked out with the 
districts involved. 

U 

Yellowstone Rational Park, Wyoming 



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Forest Fire Protection 

Actios was taken on the first forest fire of the season on 3ay 20 ia 
Che Laser Valley , 2.5 si lee east of the ranger station. The fire was 
mas caused #ad consumed nearly two acres «<f sagebrush before final 
suppression* 

The latest statue of developments at the West Yellowstone Interagency 
Fire Control Center ere a a follows; 

1. Operations built lag and buakhouse completed hut not accepted 
yet *■- acme ffiin^jr work has yet to he accomplished* 

2. Esjuipegmt for the Center will be brought In frees Missoula on 
June 5 end 4. 

3. Contract for the Slurry facility wee let to the Colt Construe* 
tion Company, Billings, Montana* 

Building. Fire Prote ct ion 

On Hay 31 » ft spec la 1 brigade training exercise was completed aader 
the able guidance of Yellowstone Ferk C^jspany Fire Marshal F*»l Connor. 
The exercise included ladder training, boss carries, etc* A test 
arables? was set up at the H&ssaoth Motor Inn* 

tas*ctss«d Tree diseases 

Blister Rust Control field work sseps with working instructions were 
prepared far 1967 field smaoxi* The rifees eradication progress scheduled 
for this season encompasses the completion of 15,630 acres In various 
categories. 

The Selection Toadflax control program Mpn Hey 15, Inclement weather 
hampered spray c*pexations the last week til May; however » the Msassnth 
caapgrouad area is near completion. The hooaone 24S-T at 2500 - 5000 
ppet in a«jueous formulation is being used. Study plots are being 
estabiished in order to evaluate spray effectiveness. 

Concessions 

The Superintendent, Acting Assistant Superintendent (S£), Administra- 
tive Officer* Chief Park Ranger, end South District Ranger eset with 
pr. G. J. Hnffltt of tile Yellowstone Fark Hedical Service oa Hay 24 
at the Lake hospital* Items of mutual concern vera discusaed and resolved, 

IS 

Yellowstone National Fark, Wyoming 






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Concessions that opened during Hey. 

Hamilton $ toroe> inc. 

May 1 * Old Faithful Basin Store 

13 • Lain? Store 

16 ■ General Store • Fishing Bridge 

27 - Basin Auto Cesqs Store - Old faithful 

27 - Canyon Village General Store 

27 - Coffee Shop - Hasaaefch 

Bcynea, l ac. 

May 4 - Picture Shop * Haasoth 

12 - Picture Shop - Old Faithful 

19 - Old Faithful Inn Shop 

24 - Tower Fall Shop 

26 - ffsynes Shop - t&tgyaa Area 

Yellowstone Park Cwmay 

May 5 - Old Faithful Cabin* 

5 - Old Faithful Coffee Shop 
10 - Coffee Shop - Msao&th 
26 - Csnyoa Village * Root** end Food 

Y ellowstone. Service Stations 

May I- Old Faithful Service Station (Icwer Station) 
1 - Lake Service Station 
26 - Csaiyon VI liege Service Station 

Garages - M»y 19 - Old Faithful 

Z6 * Piehlqg Bridge 

Wm meftei • Rqp II -■ mm 8s£wy 

On May 26, district ganger Muss end P«r$e IMPI Lyaa Thompson net with 
Milt Busby sad Ernie Gnoucb of the Yellowstone Park Company boat divi- 
sion to discuss the condition of the dock at West Thumb, Scaae boating 
services will be available at Grant village bet isoat of the operation 
will still takfl place at West Tbussh, Mr. B»sby agreed to clean up the 
West Thuafc dock, specifically to cover all rubber tires with new canvas, 
replace brofees* deck plsnka, enclose refrigerators and ail storage area, 
renove excess gsetal dock and other deb e is that no longer is ueed, end 

16 

Yellowstone national Park, Rowing 



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to paint ths Willing. This will all be secos^llshed by Use June 15 
opening date of boating operations. 

fcgaitati.cn 

«alk-throtsgh iaeooct ions were made in the Casspers Cabin Cafe at 014 
Faithful os Hsy 10 and 23* Inspect isa* wet® sia4tt of the Old Faithful 
Inn on Key 19 £84 23. Garbage disposal end cleanup v»» the wee* point 
in ell iufi^eetiaas. Cabin and roo© inspect ions were sssde of both the 
Inn and ceepevs Cabins on the 25th. 

VI, Wife and ^ish^CuUnral A.ct^Mtie^ 

Early in the meetth of Nay, Hr. Charles tove, Montana &tate University, 
•osesan, sad© ©hservations on several occasions at Sylvan Fees on 
snowslide possibilities. On ffey S, Hr. X&i?s end Id Mastioge, Forest 
Service Snow Eangnr frost the Gsiistxa national Forest „ attsnpted to 
blow potential elide sites with a IS m seceillae* rifle, with no 
success. s?ifch the exceptions o£ ewsli slides* both snow end mil* no 
aajor slide has occurred to date and the potest ial for such a slide 
has greatly diminished. 

Bear Black bear have been f sequent iag the roadside* and 

the first bear dasage wee reported on Hay 2& — a 
broken auto antenna. 

Birds The spring bird tsdgretioa la evident in the list 

of 60 species men by Perk Heturaliet George Herler 
during the ssooth, including Veery, Utiles and 
ftftlaoa's and northern Fhelarope. 

Bi son Buffalo calves were seen in the West district the 

first of the stanth 

Elk First reports ol elk calves were Say 28 (Horns 

Cenpgraond) end Hay S8 {Fountain Flats) • 

Elk Hg nast eeent The transcript of the public hearing on elk nanage- 

aeat in the Ferk held in Casper* Wyoming , in March 
wee carefully reviewed. Portions that closely 
related to future oenegeaent pregr&a* were ebstracted. 

Considerable tiaae wee spent preparing for en inter- 
agency aeetiag end a public seetiag on stsnagaxsent 
of the Northern Yellowstone elk herd. Agendas for 
both aeetiag* were prepared along with drafts of 

17 

follows tone Rational Park, Wyoming 



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correspondence announcing the meetings to cooper- 
ating agencies and interested conservation organi- 
zations. Copies of a news release announcing the 
public meeting were sent to over 50 conservation 
organizations and to the govenors and cougressaten 
in surrounding states. The interagency sheeting 
will be held on June 15 in Boaessan s>nd will be 
followed by the public nesting at Macaaoth Hot 
Springs on June 16. 

Letters announcing the availability of live elk 
from the Park were sent to 34 public goes* The 
boos were asked to submit their request by July 1. 

Data on the sex and age structure and productivity 
of the northern Yellowstone elk herd were compiled 
fross the following soirees: <1) spring census, 
(2) 1966-6? hunter harvest* <3) live trapping, 
(4) field classification of elk. This information 
was used to determine the masher of elk that should 
be removed fro« the herd during the winter of 1967-68, 



fountain Li on 



To date* 34 winterkilled elk from the Northern 
Yellowstone herd and 13 frota the Madison-Fitahole 
herd have been reported to the Biologist's office. 
Jews fro® most of these elk have been receive 
and aged. 

Two substantial reports by residents of the Canyon* 
Norris and Lake areas were ciede early in the month 
of a sonata in lion. 



Otter 



A group of five otter have been observed rejplsrly 
in the vicinity of the confluence of A lust Creek 
with the Yellowstone River. 



WhoopijBg C rane 



On Hay 9 Chief Park naturalist Good sighted a 
whooping crane at the junction of the Yellowstone 
River and Aiuta Creek in tiaydea Valley. 



Fishery .M&qasa&gnt The annual astatic resources report and the projec- 
ted aquatic resources sxeaageiaent program were pre- 
pared and submitted to the Regional Office. 

18 



Yellowstone National Park, Wyoaing 



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Roadside- 


Public Use 


Area Tread Count 


rs 

1964 




Date 


District 

North 
South 

•.est 


1967 


1 
1966 


v&aber of Bee 
1965 


1963 


Hay 7 


2 


i 


6 
9 





-2 




1 


10 

I 

-2 




Total 


3 


15 





1 


n 


May 14 


Horth 
South 
west 


3 
1 


4 

I 


3 
3 


6 
6 

-1 


— • 




Total 


4 


7 


1 


12 


- - 


May 21 


Borfch 
Sooth 

West 


6 

1 


10 

3 

J* 


3 
-I 


6 
4 

12 


6 



Ji 




Total 


1 


21 


6 


27 


14 


Kay 28 


North 
South 
Weat 


3 
3 

-2 


7 
11 


1 

10 

i -*£ 


6 

4 


■ — 

MM* 




Total 


9 


29 


20 


12 


<*• 


Bear Inci<i 


?ate: 


19*7 


1966 


Through Ksy 
1965 


1964 


1963 


Injur lea 
Damages 


1 
3 


1 
1 


1 
4 







3 


Kilted for 
Ell led by i 
Shipped to 


control 
accident 
rooe 


2 

3* 


1 
4 










o 











^Orphaned Black Bear Cuba 



19 



Tel low* tunc National Park, Wyoming 























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Public Relations 

Publicity 

On each Thursday, the Ye llw ato^,. Week ly News was issued to keep 
employees, concessioners,, and other* currently infortaed of Park 
happenings . 

There were two press releases: Edward J. *i diner's promotion to posi- 
tion of Assistant Chief SLaager of Grr*at Sraoky Mountains Satioaal Park, 
Tennessee* nod one concerning the heavy snow which limited early 
season visitors to the Park. 

Chapel flee 

Protestant eervicee were held throughout the raonth. 

Public S.3 lotions 

The third Annual Tri State Syc^ositsa was held at the Manaaoth Hvtot 
Ian May 11, 12 » and 13. The Syafwaiuia was attended by representatives 
interested la tour is© fro« the States of Idaho, Noataaa, and Wyosslng. 
Super intendetit .John S. McLaughlin welcotsad the group and a response 
laaa presented by Sir. Art Bazata, President of the Yellowstone Park 
Corapany. Speakers were frota state travel department©, hotel sad ®otel 
operators; transportation and cosKssaication. companies, &m& other 
travel organisations. Highlights of. the sweating included a talk by 
Dr. ?. J. Setae-far, Director, Atmospheric Science Research Center, 
State University of Haw York. His talk was oa "^hat Boppens to Yellow- 
stone in the Wintertlsae" or "Yellowstone at -4S°C H . His cousaents oa 
the inadvisa&ility of keeping Yellowstone roads open in the witster 
were interesting. The banquet was held friday night in the Hotel 
dining rooss where Senator Clifford Bsnaon irojB Wyoming pra&anted &H 
Yellowstone Park Company's '^Jan of the Ys&r" award to Jtr. Frank Korria 
of the Wyoming Travel Coseaisaion. Featared speaker was Cora^lius 
Heine, Special Assistant to the ©ireetor. lie talked on "gal lower one 
1972". 

On Hay 19 Chief Park Naturalist Good presented a talk to Western 
Airlines Travel Agents at the MaaKoth Motor Inn. West District 
Naturalist. Douglass presented talks to the sarce group on yjzy 20 
and 21. 

On Kay 22 seasonal naturalist Roger Wegner acceaspanied a group of 
Boreiuan scliool children on a bus tour of Black Sand Basin. The sight- 
ing of one buffalo provided the highlight of their trip. 

20 

Yellowstone Motional Park, Wyoming 



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On Hay 10, Park Ranger Lynn Thoopson escorted a group of seven Air 
force personnel on a tour of the Park. This group brought tits Swedish 
Atr Force Chief of Staff in by helicopter. Sad weather forced the© 
to stay ovar an extra day. 

Big Hole flatioaal Ba ttlefield 

Weather Conditions 

Winter persisted until the last snowfall of five inches on May 11. 
Raiu began falling on Hay 7 with thunder showers over the Memorial 
Day weekend, H&avy rain showers and strong winds occurred during 
the end of the ucnth. 

Tvrcpegatures retrained generally cool with the ejiniiaura for the $*cnth 
of 11 qb Hay 1* the taaxitnufls was 73 cm the 2&th with five days of 70° 
or Qore. 

Decreas e i n Xrav«l 

Late snow wait, soft roads and washouts lie id up opening the entrance 
road to the Siege Area until Hay 8i« ^he ro8G *# at ill rough and will 
be «o until the road construction is consisted. A decrease o£ 55% was 
noted for the saonth as cetaparad to the saras period for last year. 

Personnel 

Banger-Historian Walter L. Bailey cod Hay 2S. This is i?fr, Bailey's 
third season of duty at the Battlefield and he is committed to duty 
in the Armed Forces In ths fall. 

Cooperation with other State Agen cies 

x ^ «» i 'iwi Miii » ii.«iw-« ii j • - i ■ » t*w J rtMW— ««*»w * nii mm~+mf»m ■■■■* i ^U fc^ m iM 1 .- *- o •-*•'*- 

The Hantans State snow plow cleared the access road after sswwfalls 
on Hay 2 szd 3. 

An atteapt was wmtt on Hay 11, to clear the saovr from the Siege Are*? 
road with the State plow but there proved to be no bottom to the road 
and the truck bogged down just before reaching the new road. 

|teJLnten ancg_ 

Cleanup and painting occupied jeuch of our fciise during the tuoath in 
preparation for the sumer visitation, Several signs were repainted 
as was the eajsevaa floor, residence parch floor, outhouses insid* and 
the celling of ona trailer repaired end painted. 

21 

Yellowstone National Park, wyotaiag 



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Sett liag o£ till opened e bole in the reed on the vest side ft£ th* 
river bridge, 

Settling o£ sell over wster and s*ver linss has been considerable 
this spring, la essay pieces the settling is froa 12 to 18 laches sad 
bss caused the blacktop on the rosdwsy crossings to also settle:. 



22 
Yellowstone flat tonal Perk, vyoraing 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

Design and Construction Narrative 

May 1967 

Continued winter weather kept roost contract construction work shut down 
most of the month. 

Plans, Maps and Surveys ; 

Working Drawing NP-YEL-6302, Road & Parking, Canyon Laundry Building. 

Approved by Acting Regional Director April 26, subject to comments. 

Concessioner Working Drawing NP-YEL-8599, Electrical Distribution System, 
Mammoth Lodge Area. Approved by Regional Director May 16, subject 
to comments . 

Concessioner Working Drawing NP-YEL-8693, Log Cabins, Roosevelt Lodge, 
Tower Junction. Approved by Regional Director May 16, subject to 

comments . 

Concessioner Working Drawing NF-YEL-8715, Remodelling Gift Shop, Lake 
Lodge. Approved by Regional Director May 16, subject to comments. 

Concessioner Working Drawing NP-YEL-3795, Electrical Plot Plan and Cabin 
Layout, Cabin Area, Lake Hotel. Approved by Regional Director 
May 18, subject to comments. 

Concessioner Working Drawing NP-YEL-8690, LP Gas Service, Roosevelt 

Cabin Area, Roosevelt Lodge. Approved by Acting Regional Director 
May 25, subject to comments. 

Resume Work Orders : 

Effective April 27, 1967: Wade's Inc., Construction of 5 residences, 
Mammoth, and one 8-unit apartment building, Canyon; Roads and 
Utilities, Contract No. 14-10-2-101-9 

Effective May 24, 1967: Peats Vac Post & Pole, Construction of Footbridge, 
Old Faithful Area, Contract No. 14-10-2-101-19 

Effective May 31, 1967: Clark's Ready-Mix Concrete, Construction 

of Utility Extensions, Various Areas, Contract No. 14-10-2-101-16 

Meetings attended by the Management Assistant (Programs) included: 

Staff Meetings, May 4 and May 18. 

Contract Administration Procedures Meeting, May 15. 

Yellowstone Park Company Master Plan explanation Meeting, May 23. 

23 
Yellowstone »t:< aal Parti, Wyoming 



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BIG HOLE NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD 

Design and Construction Narrative 

May 1967 

All construction work still shut down due to winter weather, 



£• Mclaughlin 



In triplicate 

cc: 

Baglaasl inrcccor, Hidtmat Ksgion 

Library 

Asst. Supt. (SS) 

File 

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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 83020 
May 1967 
CHIEF PARK RANGER'S MONTHLY NARRATIVE REPORT 

GENERAL 

Weather Conditions; Cold weather prevailed during the first part 
of May. A general warming trend began at mid-month and continued 
until the end of May. The warming trend caused a rapid decrease 
in the heavy snow cover, with a subsequent increase in water flow 
throughout the Park. 

Because of unusually high snow depth and water content for this 
time of the year, special snow measurements were taken at various 
stations on May 15. Following is a summary of these snow conditions 
as they occurred on this date: 



Greatest snow accumulation - 66 inches 

Least snow accumulation - 26 inches 

Average snow accumulation - 41.0 inches 

Average water content - 17.7 inches 



- Lewis Divide 

- Northeast Entrance 



By May 23, Lost Creek had jumped its banks and flooded into the 
meadow north of the Tower Ranger Station. Part of this flood water 
diverted from Its normal course through Pleasant Valley and headed 
east toward the Yellowstone River bridge. There the water rushed 
on down the edge of the main road undermining the blacktop, washing 
out culverts and carrying away road shoulders on both sides (see 
enclosed photographs). National Park Service crews, using heavy 
equipment and blasting powder, worked for three days to contain the 
flooding and to rechannel Lost Creek back into Pleasant Valley. 

Minor flooding damage was also reported in the Lamar Sub-District. 

Various high and low temperatures recorded around the Park were: 





Max. 




Mln. 






Temp 


Date 


Temp 


Date 


Mammoth 


78 


5/22 & 23 


1. 


5/ 1 


Lamar 


79 


5/23 


15 


5/13 


Old Faithful 


72 


5/23 


3 


5/ 6 


Wast Yel iowstone 


77 


5/21 


6 


5/ 6 


Lake 


67 


5/24 


- 2 


5/ 5 


Snake River 


75 


5/23 


4 


5/ 3 



Yellowstone Lake was still Ice bound as of May 28. 



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Increase or Decrease in Travel ; Visitors entering Yellowstone 
National Park during May totaled 71,046. Automobi les entering the 
Park reached 19,735. This is a 12.1 percent decrease in travel as 
compared to May 1966. 

Due to snow depths, Dunraven Pass did not open to public travel until 
noon on May 27. Craig Pass opened to the public on the 17th. Snow 
depth at Craig Pass was around 5 feet when it opened. Within two 
days beers were begging along the road. Sylvan Pass opened on May 26. 
The Beartooth highway opened on May 26, but was closed the 29th and 
31st, 6 hours each closure, due to weather conditions. 

By May 26, the entrance stations were operating on a 12-hour schedule. 

Compared to May 1966, there was a 12.4 percent decrease in travel 
at the North Entrance. A total of 599 "Golden Passports" were sold 
at this entrance in May. 

An increase in travel at Lamar was not noticeable until mid-month 
when warmer weather prevailed. 

There was a decrease in travel of ii percent at the South Entrance. 
In May 1966, 3,166 vehicles entered this entrance while 2,833 entered 
in May 1967. One hundred and thirteen "Golden Passports" were sold 
at the South Entrance. 

East Entrance travel was down .09 percent compared to the same period 
last year. Four hundred and sixty-two "Golden Passports" were sold 
at the East Entrance. 

Due to late melting snow and storms there was very light travel in 
the Old Faithful area. The Old Faithful campground was not usable 
until the last few days of the month and the Madison campground was 
not opened unti I the 19th due to snow. 

At the West Entrance a total of 701 "Golden Passports" were sold as 
compared to 850 sold during this period last year. 

Visitors : 

May 3 Dr. Jessop B. Low, Leader, Utah Cooperative Wildlife 

Research Unit; and Dr. Shupe, Department of Veterinary 
Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 

May 4 Mr. Ed Smith, Fire Equipment Salesman, American LaFrance 
Company 

May 8 Mr. Chuck Syverson, Weather Bureau, Boise, Idaho 



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May il Mr. Kenneth Greer, Montana Fish and Game Department, 
Bozeman, Montana 

May II Mr. Heine, Special Assistant to the Director, Washington, 
0. C. 

May 18 Captain Hank Hancock, Montana Highway Patrol 

May 23 Mr. McLain, Chief Budget Analyst, National Park Service, 
Washington, D. C. 

May 26 Mr. Harvey V. Toko, Forest Pest Control, Region I, U. S. 
Forest Service; and Mr. David A. Graham, Forest Pest 
Control, Region I, U. S. Forest Service 

May 29 Mr. Trevor Arthur, Training Specialist, Victoria National 
Parks, Australia 

May 31 Mr. Jim Morgan, Research Biologist, Idaho Fish and Game 
Department 

Special Activities ; On May 23, Park Forester White traveled to 
Helena, Montana, to attend a weather modification meeting. There 
were twelve other federal, state, and private agencies represented. 
The meeting was called by the Soil Conservation Service In order to 
better acquaint those present with weather modification activities 
now in progress and solicit discussion on the future of weather 
modification as It might affect the various agencies. A separate 
report of this meeting is being prepared. 

The Superintendent, Acting Assistant Superintendent (SS), Administrative 
Officer, Chief Park Ranger, and South District Ranger met with 
Dr. G. J. Moffitt of the Yellowstone Park Medical Service on May 24 
at the Lake hospital. Several items of mutual concern were discussed 
and resolved. 

During the evening of May 28, the Chief Park Ranger, Assistant 
Superintendent (Opr), Acting Assistant Superintendent (SS), and 
the Park Forester met with a group of forest recreation seniors 
from Colorado State University. Various aspects of Park management 
were discussed as the entire program was kept on a very informal 
basis. 

Acting Chief Park Ranger Morey attended the Superintendent's staff 
meeting on May 4, and Chief Park Ranger Estey attended on May 18. 









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ADMINISTRATION 

Personnel ; Park Ranger Charles A. Lamb entered on duty in 
Yellowstone on May 29, transferring here from the Albright 
Training Center at Grand Canyon National Park. Ranger Lamb will 
be stationed at the South Entrance. 

Sub-District Ranger Gordon Boyd was detailed to Acting Law 
Enforcement officer effective May I. 

Ronald Lambertson entered on duty May 15 as a seasonal Biological 
Technician. Much of Mr. Lambertson's time will be spent on 
re-measuring permanent vegetation study plots inside and outside 
exclosures on the Northern Yellowstone winter range. 

Malcolm Berg, Project Supervisor, Blister Rust Control, entered on 
duty May 29. One Laborer, Blister Rust Control, also entered on 
duty May 29. 

Two Fire Control Aids entered on duty in May. 

Seasonal Rangers entering on duty in May included 6 in the South 
District, 2 in the West District, and 4 in the North District. 

Sub-District Ranger Danforth and family moved from West Yellowstone 
to Mammoth on May 4 and then moved to summer quarters at Bechler 
on May 26. 

Inservice Training : Canyon Sub-District Ranger Mernin and Park 
Ranger Ben Ladd attended the Montana Law Enforcement Academy at 
Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana, from May 7 to 19. 

Forestry Technician Reeves attended a Basic Management Techniques 
Training Course May I to 5 in Billings, Montana, conducted by the 
Portland Office of the Civil Service Commission. 

On May 2, Fire Control Technician Larry Brown departed for Missoula, 
Montana, for a 5-day smokejumping retraining session. 

Safety and Health : Twelve motor vehicle accidents occurred in May. 
A total of 25 motor vehicle accidents have been reported and 
investigated for the year through May. 

*0n May 21, Susan Lovegren, daughter of Assistant Superintendent 
Lovegren, fell from the slide at the canteen playground and broke 
her left arm. She was treated at the Mammoth clinic and taken to 
the Livingston hospital for surgery. 



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On May 30, Fire Dispatcher Charles G. Lamb was taken to the 
Livingston hospital for treatment and observation following a 
possible heart attack. 

On May I, during a heavy snowstorm, a two car, head-on accident 
occurred in the vicinity of Lewis Lake. The accident resulted in 
one fatality and nine seriously injured victims which required 
hospitalization for varying lengths of time. One driver was a 
member of the U. S. Air Force, and the other a member of the West 
- German Army. This accident precipitated three other vehicles being 
involved in accidents at the original scene due to the first accident 
vehicles obstructing the road. Rangers from Canyon, Lake, West 
Thumb, Snake River, and Teton National Park assisted in the emergency 
procedures related to this accident, as well as numerous Park 
maintenance people. 

CONSERVATION, I NTERPRETAT I ON 6. USE 

Research and Observations ; The first buffalo calves began 
appearing on April 28; the first elk calves were seen beginning 
on May 22. 

Black bear have been frequenting the roadsides and the first bear 
damage was reported on May 29— a broken auto antenna. 

Two substantial reports by residents of the Canyon and Lake areas 
were made early in the month of a mountain lion Fn the vicinity of 
Canyon. 

A group of five otter have been observed regularly in the vicinity 
of the confluence of Alum Creek with the Yellowstone River. 

Early in the month of May, Mr. Charles Love, Montana State University, 
Bozeman, made observations on several occasions at Sylvan Pass on 
snowslide possibilities. On May 9, Mr. Love and Ed Nestings, 
Forest Service Snow Ranger from the Gallatin National Forest, 
attempted to blow potential slide sites with a 75 MM recoil less 
rifle, with no success. With the exceptions of small slides, both 
snow and soil, no major slide has occurred to date and the potential 
for such a slide has greatly diminished. 

Range Studies: Emphasis throughout the month was on evaluating forage 
utilization and ungulate use on the Northern Yellowstone and Gallatin 
winter ranges. 

On the Northern Yellowstone winter range utilization of key grass and 
browse species was measured on 32 permanent study plots. Browse 
utilization and condition was measured on three aspen, six sagebrush 



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and two willow plots. An Index of relative ungulate use on most of 
the plots was obtained by pellet group counts. In addition to 
obtaining quantitative measurements of forage utilization on permanent 
plots, general utilization patterns were evaluated by reconnaissance 
of more extensive areas of winter range. By the end of the month 
evaluation of forage utilization on the lower one-fourth of the 
winter range had been completed. 

Forage utilization was measured on 10 permanent plots in the Upper 
Gallatin winter range on May 25 and 26. Relative ungulate use was 
determined from pellet group counts on four permanent transects. 
Most of one day was spent examining winter range use in the Daly 
Creek-Black Butte Creek-Lava Butte Creek area. 

Utilization of old growth grass and browse was extremely heavy 
throughout the winter range; much heavier than during the winter 
of 1965-66. Use of new spring growth was also much heavier than 
any other year since estimates of spring utilization have been 
obtained in 1965. Elk days use per acre were the highest since 
the winter of 1963-64. No winterkilled elk were found, however. 
Forage utilization on the Gallatin winter range is covered in more 
detail in a separate report. 

Resource Studies; Some time was spent on matters relating to 
resource study contracts. Additional funds have been provided to 
Colorado State University for completion of the black bear study 
(Yell-N-13). This will include publication of several hundred 
copies of a bibliography on black beer. The final study reports 
are still expected by the end of July. 

According to Dr. John Craighead the final report on the elk 
migration study (Yell-N-4) is well along, but will not be completed 
by May 31, 1967, as called for in contract 14-10-0232-1208. Payment 
of the $4,500 covered by this contract will not be made until the 
final report is accepted. 

Protection; A total of eight reported law enforcement incidents 
occurred during May. Of this number, one was reportable under 
the FBI Uniform Crime Report. For comparison, there were 22 law 
enforcement incidents reported in 1966 for the same period. 

A total of 12 record and security checks were made for other federal, 
state, and private agencies during the month. 

The general fishing season opened at sunrise on May 28 with most 
streams running in flood conditions. Good success was reported at 
the Blacktail Lakes and slow conditions were reported at Trout Lake 
where a 7± pound and an 8$ pound fish were taken. 



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Patrols were accomplished as manpower allowed. 

All climbing rescue equipment at the Canyon Ranger Station has been 
inspected and replaced as necessary. Additional storage racks were 
devised and installed, and all equipment generally made ready for 
the season. 

An inspection of Uncle Tom's Trail on May 28 by Canyon Ranger 
personnel revealed considerable damage has resulted since last 
fall from falling rock. Many large boulders have come to rest on 
the black-top trail on the upper part, and extensive damage has 
resulted on the steel stairways on the lower part. 

Assistance was given in locating a lost 5-year old boy on the 24th. 

One offense occurred on the 28th at Old Faithful when several signs 
and a car radio antenna were stolen from the Old Faithful Visitor 
Center grounds. 

Forest Fire Protection : Action was taken on the first forest fire 
of the season on May 20 In the Lamar Valley, 2.5 miles east of the 
ranger station. The fire was man caused and consumed nearly 2 acres 
of sagebrush before final suppression. 

The latest status of developments at the West Yellowstone Interagency 
Fire Control Center are as follows: 

1. Operations building and bunkhouse completed but not accepted 
yet— some minor work has yet to be accomplished. 

2. Equipment for the Center wilt be brought in from Missoula 
on June 5 and 6. 

3. Contract for the slurry facility was let to the Colt 
Construction Company, Billings, Montana. 

Building Fire Protection : The Mammoth fire brigade responded to a 
call at the Mammoth restaurant on May 9. The only damage was to an 
electric engine which burned out on the refrigeration unit. 

On May 31, a special brigade training exercise was completed under 
the able guidance of Yellowstone Park Company Fire Marshal Paul Connor. 
The exercise included ladder training, hose carries, etc. A test 
problem was set up at the Mammoth Motor Inn. 

Structural fire hazard inspections are near completion in the North 
District. Inspections are being initiated in the South and West 
Districts. 



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Insects and Tree Diseases : Blister Rust Control field work maps 
with working instructions were prepared for the 1967 field season. 
The ribes eradication program scheduled for this season encompasses 
the completion of 15,690 acres )n the various categories. 

The Dalmation Toadflax control program began May IS, utilizing labor 
personnel from the Maintenance Division. Inclement weather hampered 
spray operations the last week in May; however, the Mammoth campground 
area is near completion. The hormone 245 -T at 2500 - 3000 ppr,, in 
aqueous f ormu I at i on is being used. Study plots are being established 
In order to evaluate spray effectiveness. 

t Ik Management : The transcript of the public hearing on elk management 
in the Park held in Casper, Wyoming, in March was carefully reviewed. 
Portions that closely related to future management programs were 
abstracted. 

Considerable time was spent preparing for an interagency meeting ana 
e public meeting on management of the Northern Yellowstone elk herd. 
Agendas for both meetings were prepared along with drafts of corresponoence 
announcing the meetings to cooperating agencies and interested conservation 
organizations. Copies of a news release announcing the public meeting 
were sent to over 50 conservation organizations and to the governors 
and congressmen in surrounding states. The interagency meeting will 
be held on June 15 in Bozeman and will be followed by the public meeting 
at Mammoth Hot Springs on June 16. 

Letters announcing the availability of live elk from the Park were 
sent to 34 public zoos. The zoos were asked to submit their requests 
by July I . 

Data on the sex and age structure and productivity of the Northern 
Yellowstone elk herd was compiled from the following sources: 
(I) spring census, (2) 1^66-67 hunter harvest, (3) live trapping, (4) 
field classification of elk. This information was used to determine 
the number of elk that should be removed from the herd during the 
winter of 1967-68. 

To date, 34 winterkilled elk from the Northern Yellowstone here ana 
13 from the hadison-Firehole herd have been reported to the Biologist's 
office. Jaws from most of these elk have been received and aged. 

Fishery Management : The annual aquatic resources report ana the 
projected aquatic resources management program were prepared and 
submitted to the Regional Office. 



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Bear Management ; 



Roadside-Public Use Area Trend Count 



Date 



May 7 



District 



North 

South 
West 

Total 



Number of Bears 



1967 


1966 


1965 


1964 


1963 


2 


6 








10 





9 





1 


! 


1 















13 







II 



May 14 



May 21 



May 28 



North 


3 


4 


5 


6 


_„ 


South 


1 


1 


3 


6 


~- 


West 





2 








— 


Total 


4 


7 


a 


12 


— 


North 


6 


ie 


3 


i 


6 


South 


i 


5 


-- 


4 





West 


1 


6 


3 


17 


6 


Total 


6 


21 


6 


27 


M 


North 


3 


7 


b 


6 


-.- 


South 


3 


II 


lo 


4 


— 


West 


3 


II 


2 


2 


— 



Total 



29 



20 



12 



Bear Incidents: 



Injuries 

Damages 

Ki I led for control 
Ki I led by accident 
Shipped to zoos 



1967 



Through May 
1966 1965 1964 



1963 



1 


1 


1 








3 


1 


4 





3 


2 


1 


C 











4 





c 


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3 a 















a 0rphaned Black Beer Cubs 






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Maintenance ; The marking of hazard trees along roads and developed 
areas began May 12. Coordination of tree removal is being worked out 
with the districts involved. 

Sanitation ; Walk-through Inspections were made in the Campers Cabin 
Cafe at Old Faithful on May 10 and 23. Inspections were made of the 
Old Faithful Inn on May 19 and 23. Garbage disposal and cleanup was 
the weak point in all inspections. Cabin and room inspections were 
made of both the Inn and Campers Cabins on the 25th. 

Concessioners ; Concession facilities continued to open in May. 

On May 26, District Ranger Nuss and Park Ranger Lynn Thompson met 
with Milt Rusby and Ernie Gnouch of the Yellowstone Park Company 
boat division to discuss the deplorable condition of the oock at 
West Thumb. Some boating services will be available at Grant Village 
but most of the operation will still take place at West Thumb. 
Mr. Rusby agreed to clean up the West Thumb dock, specifically to 
cover all rubber tires with new canvas, replace broken deck planks, 
enclose refrigerators and oil storage area, remove excess metal dock 
and other debris that is no longer used, and to paint the building. 
This will alt be accomplished by the June 15 opening date of boating 
operations. 

Sub-District Ranger Hancock gave an orientation program for 59 
concession employees on the 24th. 

Complaints; Food service has been extremely slow during the latter 
part of May at the Old Faithful Inn and Campers Cabin Cafe. There 
have been no written complaints but it is felt that many visitors 
are very dissatisfied with this slow service. 

RESOURCE PLANNING 

Cooperation with Other Federal, State, or Local Agencies; The 
U. S. Geological Survey Thermal Waters Study Team is down to the 
450 foot level in their second well in the Firehole Lake area. 
They are providing on site information service to the public about 
their operation (see enclosed photographs). 

On May 2, Rangers at West Yellowstone assisted the west Yellowstone 
Chief of Police and the Gallatin County Sheriff's Deputy in locating 
a vehicle reported to be involved in a hit-and-run case at the town 
of West Yellowstone. 

Members of the Fish and Wildlife Service started moving into their 
facilities at Lake on May 24 and immediately started a few of their 
research projects. 



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PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Pub! ic Relations : On May 10, Park Ranger Lynn Thompson escorted 
a group of seven Air Force personnel on a tour of the Park. This 
group brought the Swedish Air Force Chief of Staff in by helicopter, 
Bad weather forced them to stay over an extra day. 



i - • EsteY. 



Harold J. Estey 
Chief Park Ranger 



Enclosures 

cc: ^superintendent 






• ■ 



I 

































.Superintendent 



June 9, 1967 



Administrative Officer 



Monthly report - May 

One on-the-job Injury was reported for a seasonal employee of the 
Maintenance Division. This was not a lost time accident but the employee 
did require medical treatment. (100-day scheduled charge.) 

Orientation material for permanent employees was presented to the following 
individuals: 



Action 

Conversion to Career-Conditional Appointment 
(Subject- to- Furlough) as Operator General 
(Light Duty), effective May 21. 

Conversion to Career- Conditional Appointment 
( iubject- to- Furlough) as Operator General 
(Light Duty), effective May 21. 

Conversion to Career-Conditional Appointment 
(Subject- to- Furlough) as Maintenanceman, Big 
Hole National Battlefield, effective May 7. 

Four permanent employees transferred into the Park during the month and 
received local orientation material for transferred personnel. 



Robert A. Hape 



Richard C. Langevin 



Lowell D. Willi 



Robert E. Sellers 



Keith H. Warner 



Jack £. Gould 



From: Supervisory Park Ranger GS-453-11 

Glacier National Park 
To: Supervisory Park Ranger (Assistant 

Chief) GS-453-12, effective May 7 

From: Supply Clerk GS- 2040-5, Glacier 

National Park 
To: General Supply Assistant GS- 2001-7, 

effective May 21 

From: Electronics Technician G3-856-7, 
U. S. Forest Service, 
Santa Barbara, California 

To: Electronics Technician GS-856-9, 
effective May 21 



Charles A. Lamb From: Park Banger GS-453-5, Albright 

Training Center 
To: Park leaser CS-453-5, to be effective 
June 4 



a— lit ant Procurement and Property Management Officer Louis G. Ualisch 
completed one week of training conducted by the General Services Admin- 
istration In Washington 0. C. During this one week training he com- 
pleted two courses: Inventory Control of Supplies end Hater ia is, and 
Bconomlc Order Quantity Techniques. 



Accounts Maintenance Clerk Curtis 8. Anderson and Personnel Management 
Specialist Oda L. Arnold attended the General Services Administration's 
training session. Shipping Household Goods, in Sock Springs, Wyoming, 
Hey 26. This was a six hour course. 

Perk Rangers Gerald S. Meruin sad Benjamin P. Ladd completed the 80-hour 
Montane Lew Enforcement Academy conducted at Montana State University, 
Montana, May 7 through May 19. 



The Department of the Interior's 10-year Length -of- Service gabions were 
presented to the following employees: 

Completed 10 years 
&B£ of service as of: 

Charles E. Cortner April 13, 1967 

Wayne B. Uoppe April 24, 1967 

Ralph C. King April 23, 1967 

Laurence P. Wanlass December 11, 1966 

Arthur £• teiite August 3, 1966 

Clerk-Typist Elsie Plumner was presented her 10-year service pin at an 
informal ceremony in the Supply Center which was attended by members of 
the Supply Breach and other members of the Administrative Division. 



fen month of Hey was designated for the 1967 Savings Bond - F r e edo m 
Share campaign. We are a little late In getting the campaign organised 
since material was not received until the letter part of the month. The 
Super inten d en t hes designated Personnel Officer Miller as the Campaign 
Coordinator, and he hes asked the Division secretaries, and Helen Tracy 
of the Superintendent's Office, to serve if Keywomen to assist in pro- 
viding Information to permanent personnel and to accept their enrollments. 
The local campaign will run through June 16. 

The following approved position descriptions were received: 

Assistant Superintendent, GS- 301-13. This is a ^description of the 
position formerly occupied by J. A. Martinek. 



Supervisory Park laager (Lake Sub- District), CS-453-9. This is a 
redeecrlptlon of the position occupied by W. Tom Hilllgan. 

Supervisory Park Ranger (Crant Village Sue-District), CS-453-9. 

the Croat Village Sub-District has been formally established sod includes 
the developnwnts at both Grant Village and the West Thus© sree. Recruit 
hea been initiated through the Servlcewide Career Development and 
Plan. 



yf^swNm - iwmm wm^im 



Asat. Superintendent (SS) 

#0010 



Clerk, 

Payroll Clerk, #1039 

Supv. Fark Sanger, 
#3020 

Perk Ranger (Wildlife 
Mgnt.), #3041 

Park Ranger #3092 



Sup*. Office 
Administration 
adn&nist ration 



J. Martin** 
G. Stork 

■aa e >*sa-*^>s» *>*s^b* 

S. Wtdaer 

W. Baraore 
K. Lindfors* 



rlpy* ^ 



Pending 
Pending 
P. Anderson 

Pending 

L. Hays** 
selected 



Civil Begiaeer, 

#4004 


Maintenance 


Redeecribed 
position 


Pending 


Rngineering Technician, 
#4011 


Maintenance 


R. Weaver 


Pending 


Sigamaker, #4034 


Maintenance 


8. suesenberry 


Pending 


Caretaker, #4084 


Maintenance 


J. Dexter 


Pending 



*Mr. Lindfors presently on one year's leave-without- pay. 

**Mr. Bays selected for an Identical Additional position which was 
established in Mr. Lindfors' 



Frederick T. Anderson, Supervisory Park Ranger GS-9, Yosemite, has been 
selected for pronotlon to our vacant Law Eaforcenent Officer position. 
Effective date, June 18. 



Arthur E. Unite, Fireman-Low Pressure ( Subject -to- Pur lough) has been 
selected tor promotion to the position of Malnteoancemaa at Flaming Gorge 
Recreation Area. The effective date of Mr. Unite's transfer is June 4; 
his lest day of work here was Hay 31. 



Perk Sanger Lynn H. Thompson has accepted promotion to the position of 
Concessions Analyst GS-9 in the Washington Office to be effective June 18. 

uilliam A. Tyson received a temporary appointment on Bay 29 to the position 
of Supply Clerk, CS-3. 



Jack Koons entered on duty May 8, 1967 as Cook for the Beartooth Hess 



o 



Ore Lee Miller terminated May 19. Mrs. Miller was the Cook for the West 
Thumb Mess. 

HB&&BBP* aw* sawfflwpcy jpn# pf fraifoy* ^c^y^^n 

Letters of employment inquiry received ..... 183 

Applications for employment received •••••• 1? 

Applications rated >6 

Applications entered on register ........ 3D 



There were 274 on the payroll for the period ending May 6 compared to 286 
e year ago. There were 298 on the payroll tor the period ending May 20 
compared to 311 a year ago. There were 350 on the payroll for the period 
ending June 3 compared to 360 a year ago. 

Total paid esployees ats of May 31, 1967 ...... 351 

secessions • •••••• 110 

Separations .............. 4 

There were no wege assignments for PCPE during the month* 

During the month there were 42 Sills for Collection issued totaling 
$3,671.75. 

The cost sheets for the month of April were received from cite Midwest 
Field Finance Office on May IS. 



work to May 1 266,000 

work for the month of Kay 94,500 

1967 total to date 360,500 

Residence Mo. 8 and multiplex apartments 4A and 48 have been leased to 
the Yellowstone Perk Company. Agreements were made up assigning these 
funsters effective May 15 end June 1. 



Two hundred one shipments were checked in totaling 769 line items with a 
value of $25,164. Issues valued at $26,196 comprising 970 line items 
were made to 634 customers. Surcharge orders were processed in the 
mount of $11,625, in addition to $4,916 in direct charge orders. Stores 
stock shipments received during May totaled 23,420 pounds. Two hundred 
thirteen purchase orders were issued during May with an approximate value 
of $52,136. Journal Voucher Ho. 32-690 was received from the Midwest legion 
Field Finance Office, reducing our stores inventory account by $31,455.11 
for low cost sales items. This brings our total accountable inventory 
down to $56,418.85. We did not reduce our inventory by the amount of 
$8,196.60 as shown on the Journal Voucher as this is the value of excess 
stock which has been reported but not yet transferred or sold. 

The Bear tooth Mess was opened for dinner on May t* 

The West Thumb Mess was closed on May 19, as most of the crews in that 
area, including the road crew, were reassigned to other areas. 

The two Bombardier-Muskeg" over snow vehicles reported excess on Report 
Mo. 101-1-67 were transferred to the Bureau of Land Management , State 
Radio &op, Lander, Wyoming. The units were picked up May 16. 

On May 24, we received notice from General Services Administration of 
Sale 8DPS-67-267, opening date June 20, 1967. The only item located at 
Yellowstone is Item 25, Horse trailer, 2 horse capacity, shop 



An order to resume work was issued May 24 to Pent a Vac Post & Pole, Hulett, 
Wyoming, to continue construction of Footbridge at Old Faithful Area. 39 
days of contract time remains for this project. 

Clark* s Ready Mix Concrete Construction Co. began work on the utilities 
Extensions at various areas in the Park on May 31. 41 days of contract 
time remains on this project. The completion date is recorded as 
July 10, 1967 

Invitations to Bid have been mailed to interested bidders for Project 
TEL-S128 for construction of Entrance Station, Bast Entrance. Bid opening 
date is 2:00 p.a. local time, June 1, 1967. 

The Husky 011 Company of Cody, Wyoming was the successful bidder on our 
road oil requirements for this season. A contract with a monetary value 
of over $100,000 was awarded to this Company May 12. 




C. L. 




<l REPLY REFER TO: 



N2615 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 83020 

June 8, 1967 



Memorandum 

To : Superintendent 

Proa: Chief Park Naturalist 

Subject: Monthly Narrative Report, Interpretation, May 1967 

Interpretive Services and Planning : 

The Canyon Visitor Center opened May 26 at noon and the Old Faithful 
Visitor Center on May 1. Both operated on an 8 am. to 5 pm. schedule 
during the month, with the ranger personnel at Canyon cooperating in 
keeping the facility open during the lunch hour. 

The new 3M audio amplifier and tape machine installed at Canyon 
Visitor Center on May 30 is operating satisfactorily and adds con- 
siderable atmosphere to the building. 

New photo-electric eye counters were installed at the Canyon Visitor 
Center and work well except during periods when bright sunlight enters 
the doorway. A hood covering may eliminate this problem. 

Cone talks at Old Paithful began on May 18 with 42 programs presented 
to 5152 visitors. Camp fire programs began on May 27. 

The Lake Interpretive Prospectus was approved by the Regional Director 
on May 16. 

Personnel : 

The following seasonal personnel entered on duty in the naturalist 
divlsinn during the month: 



North 



South 



West 



Wayne P. Replogle 

Lowell Biddulph 
Ted Parkinson 
Charles Williams 



May 31 

May 28 

May 29 

May 27 



Jerry Hoi lis 
George Marler 
Jack Parker 



May 30 
May 1 
May 8 

The South District Naturalist moved to Lake on May 27. 



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Yellowstone Library and Mac euro Association 

Geri Hape, bookroora clerk, worked a total of 81 hours during the month 

Self-guiding trail leaflets dispensed during the month were : 

Upper Geyser Basin 3000 (est.) 

Fountain Paint Pots 2200 (est.) 

Mud Volcano 1300 

Terrace K ature Trail 800 (est.) 

Canyon rangers were helpful in keeping the Mud Volcano trailhead 
dispenser supplied with booklets. 

Two books were accessioned during the month. Routine filing of 
materials and shelving of books was accomplished. 

Special Activities : 

Messrs. Ed Cox and John Dumeyer, Ground Water Division, United States 
Geological Survey, Cheyenne, Wyoming visited the office of the Chief 
Park Naturalist several times during the month. 

On May 12 Carl Eayden, roving writer- photographer for the Sa' t Lake 
Tribune, visited with the Chief Park naturalist. 

On May 17 West District Naturalist Douglass participated in a fire 
drill with the firetruek. Other participants were Lynn Williamson, 
West District Ranger, and Max Hancock, West District Sub-district 
Ranger and the Yellowstone Park Company fire marshal 1. 

On May 19 Chief Park Naturalist Good presented a talk to Western 
Airlines Travel Agents at the Mammoth Motor Inn. West District 
Naturalist Douglass presented talks to the same group on May 20 
and 21. 

On May 22 seasonal naturalist Roger Wegner accompanied a group of 
Bozeaen school children on a bus tour of Black Sand Basin. The 
sighting of one buffalo provided the highlight of their trip. 

On May 22 the Assistant Chief Park Naturalist and the South District 
Naturalist made a trip to Bozeraan to pick up YLMA publications, 
interpretive program folders and self-guiding trail booklets from 
Art craft Printers. A considerable volume of this material was 
delivered to Canyon for storage on May 23. 

H lstory : 

On May IS Chief Park Naturalist Good and Park Naturalist Haines 
visited the Rahn ranch south of Livingston to investigate prehis- 
toric Indian cave sites on that property. 



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Resear ch and Observation ; 

Wildlife Observation: 

On Hay 9 Chief Park Naturalist Good sighted a whooping crane at 
the junction of the Yellowstone River and Alum Creek in Hayden 
Valley. 

On Hay 26 a Park visitor reported sighting a black crowned night 
heron at Pelican Creek. 

The spring bird migration is evident in the list of 60 species 
seen by Park Naturalist George Msrler during the month, inclu- 
ding Veery, Wlllet and both Wilson's and Northern Phalarope. 
Buffalo calves were seen in the West District the first of the 
month and first reports of elk calves were May 28 (Norris Camp- 
ground and Hay 30 (Fountain Flats). Bears and their cubs appeared 
along roads as the snow melted. 

Collection Permits : The following collecting permits were approved: 

John F. Burger, U. of Calif., Berkeley, Calif Insects 

Delbert A. Greenwood, Utah State University Water & plants 

LeRoy K. Henry, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh Plants 

W. Hilton Johnson, University of Illinois Rock & minerals 

Dr. Jessop B. Low, Utah State University Water & plants 

Charles F. Mueller, Montana State University Sagebrush lizard 

Lewis K. Napton, Univ. of Calif., Berkeley Obsidian 

Stephen Spoagberg, Midwestern University Soil samples 

Gary A. Wright, University of Michigan Obsidian 

Wayne Winters, U.S. Steel, Geneva, Utab Water & plants 

T. Yamemoto, University of Toronto Insects 

Park Naturalist Mary Meagher was notified by Robert M. Linn, Acting 
Chief Scientist, Division of Natural Sciences, Washington Office, 
National Park Service, that her remaining school enrollment costs 
would be covered by the National Park Service research training 
program announced a year and a half ago. 

Park Naturalist Mary Meagher made one plane flight during the month 
to check buffalo numbers and locations. 

Se ismograph : 

The seismic station at Northeast Entrance was serviced on May 2. 
The station a tLake was checked May 23 and found to be inoper- 
ative. The paper will not advance after the recycle period. 

Museum : 



Work on museum storage changes continued during the month. 
Exhibits and Equipment : ( next page) 



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All roadside exhibits are open; Isa Lake and Flrehole Canyon on Hay 
26 and Obsidian Cliff on May 29. 

Five sales display reaps (topographic) were assembled. Two area orien- 
tation maps were drawn for Grant Village. 

Frank Phillips, Eastern Museum Laboratory, arrived in the Park May 
15 to install exhibits at the Grant Village Museum. Exhibit installa- 
tion began on May 17 and the job was completed on May 24. 

Exhibit installation at Fishing Bridge Museum is progressing slowly. 

The edges and corners of the photos on exhibit panels at Canyon were 
reglued. 

Visual Aids (AV) 

Equipment for the Canyon automatic program was installed on May 31 
and is functioning properly; programs are being presented as the 
crowds warrant. 



Prepared by lY^Uh^^t /# X^fo,,. • 
Ma i gare t B. lJupalx, Secretary s 

Submitted by: S# «'»'*.'- Wr* 

John M. Good 

Chief Park Naturalist 



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Yellowstone h*tional Perk, Wyoming #3020 
N-2615 June f, 1947 



To: Chief, Division of Natural Glances, WASO 
Through: superintendent, Yellowstone 

from: Research Biologist, Yellowstone 

aubjeet: Monthly Sanative Report * Kay 1967 

Hay 4, S, and 6, were spent looking at wildlife winter ranges in 
Yellowstone ami reviewing schedule© range work with Sill Sensors . 
Field »ie*dqua tears were shifted froa Grand leten to Yellowstone on 
May 27. 

Work in Grand Teton during Hay involved dCHJu*ae»tin#. elk asovesaents 
and acquainting Houston with the locations of vegetation saaxple 
units and measureeent procedures, first significant oovement onto 
Grand Teton occured on Hay 9, with iatigratlea peak on the 14th 
and 13th. 

Work in Yellowstone involved preparing en illustrated talk on 
elk relationships to the Perk's priaary purpose (ecosystem approach) 
for a scheduled seating with the Outdoor Writers Association and 
for various sweetings relating to the Park's elk aan&geaent progress 
a preliminary list of research goals and a research plan were also 
prepared. These will be reviewed with Park personnel to encourage 
their participation in the design of the overall progresu 



Glen F. Cole 



cc: 

Regional Director, Midwest 
Superintendent, Grand Teton 
Superintendent, Yellowstone 
-Management Assistant 
Research Biologist 



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si REPLY REFER TO: 

A 2615 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

~ ig Hole Nation; J. attlefield 
isdom, on tana 5 

31, 1967 



arandum 

To: i ^erintendent, Yellowstone 
From: snt Assistant, 

act: Monthly Narrative c^ort for Hay 1967 



General 

V. 7 eather Gonc'ition s : inter 'persisted until the Last snowfall of 
five inches on May 11. enow fell on six days ft the first part of 
the month with the first rain since October falling on [ay 7, 
followed by four other rains to 7 thunder showers over 

ori< ay v:;sk end. The ->erio ' r 17 to 28, was without 
moisture except for the excessive amounts of melt water running over 
ound. Heavy rain showers and strong winds occurred 29th-31st. 

• snow ^ack on the r r ■ c sltec ra >idly with the greatest 
runoff occurring May 15, and causing extensive channel' 
on the new road construction. The roar 1 to the Siere Area was severed 
just as it was setting firm enough to try driving over. 

The rjnoff from the higher surround! s contimon to cans.? 
x.orth Fork of the ig lole , .iver to rise until May 24. 
water covered all tie willow bottoms cud came within a foot of 
flowing over the causeway to the Siege Area. The only ^ot^d 

this high water was a hole which appeared ; n the road next to 
I oridge clove a retaining wall. 

jeratares refined generally cool with only six nights having 



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minimums above 32". Lnimum for the month was 11 on May 1. 
The maxinum was 75 on the 26ti< wit i five iays 70 of more. Strong 
winds occurred on 10 i?ys, moderate winds on 11 days an c or 
light winds on 10 days. 

decrease in Travel : Late snow melt, soft roads and washouts 
up opening the entrance road to the Siege Area until May i c . 
load is still re ad will be so until the road construction is 
Leted. A decrease of 55/0 was noted for the month as comnared 
to the same period for last ye?r. 



Administration 

personnel: iger-J istori ter L. ailey :8. This is 

r. iailey's third season of duty at ; ttlefiiJd le is 

itted to duty in t ted Forces in the fall. 

Cooperative Activities 

Cooperation witu Ctncr 'Jt;-te .'..^enci^s ; h i fontana itate snoi 
cleared the trailer access road Iter snowfalls oa iay 2 and 3. 

An attempt was made on May 11, to clear from the ■? r 

road with the State plow but there proved to be no bottom to the 
road ' he trick bogged down just before reaching; the new re 

construction. It took three of over two hours to get the truck 
to the highway ?nd firm ground. 

t ions 

lainteu^nre : i ainting occu iuch of our ti iring 

f month in ration for the summer visitation. Several signs 
were repainted rruseum floor, residence porch floor, 

outhouses inside and the ceiling to one trailer repaire tainted. 

About six hundred feet of old fencing was taken up, 3iled and burned 
ale new road constriction and so . Lng the river. 

Water to the Siege "rea residence sgan flowing May 18, and it was 
discoverer 1 freezing had roken pipes in ot i hot water tanks. 
Replacements were obtained at Yellowstone and were in operation 
Hay 20, for the arrival of tfaintenanceman ivilliams family. Two 
copper water lines required only minor repair;' in the Kit trailer. 

Twelve pickup loads of gravel were necessary to : ;r:ency 
repairs to the portions of roadway washed out by the heavy snow 
water runoff. 

Settling of fill opened a hole in the road on the west side of tne 
river bridge. All willow bottoms were covered during t 
it ca e within a foot of flowing over tie causew 

esi?n an. 1 ""' Construction 

Jew Construction : Settling of soil over water and sewer lines has 
been considera le this spring. In many places the settling is froni 12 
to 18 inches and has caused the Lacktop on the roadwaye crossings 
to also settle. 

During the heavy runoff of water from the ch, an oien irrigation 
ditch draining the flat south of the highway was coursing iown 
over the new road construction and contributed to most of t ter 

r e there. After discovery of the water source, we built a 
the ditch and diverted the water to a gulley in the opposite direction 
and through a culvert under the road reducing; further road 

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